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Concentration of CO2 in the Atmosphere

March 1 Green Energy News

Science and Technology:

  • BYD’s electric buses can run for an impressive 30 or so hours straight in between charges, based on the results of a pilot test performed in New York City last year during the months of August–October. Charging to full capacity took, roughly, 3–4 hours. [CleanTechnica]
  • New research by the University of Delaware and Stanford University shows that an army of offshore wind turbines could reduce hurricanes’ wind speeds, wave heights and flood-causing storm surge. [CleanTechies]

World:

  • A solar power project for Ghana will be started this September. The $350 million solar project would add 155 MW of power to the national grid and would provide power all-year-round. [Shanghai Daily]
  • A European Union summit in March billed as a step in the bloc’s efforts to combat climate change will focus on strengthening Europe’s industrial base, a draft document seen by Reuters shows. [Business Recorder]
  • When heat waves wracked Australia at the start of the year, driving up electricity demand, the presence of wind power in the country actually kept electricity costs 40% lower than they otherwise would have been, according to a new study. [ThinkProgress]
  • Neste Oil, the world’s largest producer of renewable liquid fuels, has partnered with DONG Energy, one of the leading energy groups in Northern Europe, to develop an integrated process to make renewable liquid fuel from agricultural residues. [WebWire]
  • EnBW, a leading German utility, plans to mothball two coal-fired power plant blocks in Heilbronn in Baden-Württemberg state. It says operation of the plants is no longer economically viable due to the expansion of German renewable energy capacity. [Recharge]
  • Norway has the world’s largest sovereign wealth fund, which has invested the nation’s oil wealth in a range of stocks, bonds and other vehicles. Now the country will consider pulling its enormous state oil fund out of overseas investments in fossil fuels. [Arab News]

US:

  • “Natural Gas Inventories are Headed Toward Zero” We have already withdrawn 2.4 trillion cubic feet of natural gas from inventories, and we are likely 4-6 weeks away from the bottom. At this pace, the inventory would reach zero the week of March 28th. [Energy Trends Insider]
  • Steve Kopits recently gave a presentation explaining our current predicament: the cost of oil extraction has been rising rapidly (10.9% per year) but oil prices have been flat. Major oil companies are finding their profits squeezed. [Energy Collective]
  • While Dominion Virginia Power got legislative permission to write off $400 million it spent planning a nuclear plant that may never be built, renewable-energy advocates failed to get an incentive program for solar, wind, and other renewables. [The Virginian-Pilot]
  • Florida’s legislature is resisting action on moves to open up the market for more solar power, giving consumers more freedom in a grid dominated by monopolistic utilities. This contrasts sharply with Georgia, where even the Tea Party supports more solar. [Tampabay.com]
  • 2013 was a banner year for ethanol producers, but there are a few gray clouds on the horizon that might adversely impact the industry: The EPA may reduce of the amount of ethanol in gasoline, export requires investment, and corn prices fluctuate. [Wall Street Daily]
  • Connecticut lawmakers are beginning to consider a new legislation that could make solar energy more accessible for homeowners throughout the state. About 75% of homeowners in the state have no access to renewable energy for various reasons.[Hydrogen Fuel News]
  • Genscape is reporting that renewable generation was up 30 percent for the week ending February 20, 2014, while gas consumption plummeted 35 percent as a result of the increase in renewables and weaker power demand. [Fierce Energy]

 

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