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June 30 Green Energy News

Science and Technology:

  • The International Energy Agency’s Renewable Energy Technology Deployment issued a new report looking at how policymakers and regulators may react to the surge in residential prosumers, a trend currently pushed by solar PV and, possibly soon, battery storage. [Energy Collective]

World:

  • The UK government has finalised plans to procure 53.3 GW of electricity generating capacity via its new capacity market auction mechanism. The 53.3 GW figure equates to some 80% of peak electricity use in the UK today. [reNews] (We will surely hear more on this.)
  • EU officials look at Belgium as an example for cooperative energy projects, as the 28-country bloc looks to de-carbonize and gain more energy independence. The European Commission estimates that the EU spent €1 billion per day last year on energy imports. [EurActiv]
  • At one kilometre high, the taller of two new towers to be built in the city of Wuhan in China will be the world’s tallest, but both are also environmentally friendly. They will clean the water and air around them while generating sustainable power for neighbouring buildings. [ScienceAlert]
  • The Ontario Environment Ministry is giving the green light to a $380-million wind farm that will add 40 turbines in a 16-kilometre corridor along Lake Huron. Most of the turbines will be about a kilometre inland from the beaches, but that is too close for some residents. [St. Thomas Times-Journal]
  • A £6 million large-scale solar farm in Northern Ireland has been given the green light. Northern Ireland’s Environment Minister announced planning approval for the project in Crumlin, with an installed capacity of 6.5 MW, enough for more than 1,600 homes. [Energy Live News]
  • The UK Government has given consent to go ahead with the East Anglia One offshore wind farm. It is scheduled to install up to 240 wind turbines and will generate enough electricity to power approximately 820,000 homes. [SmartMeters]
  • The government of India’s northern state of Haryana is implementing an energy conservation policy making solar power generation mandatory for certain buildings and areas. The move could create 200 MW of power and avoid significant CO2 emissions. [SmartMeters]

US:

  • The Minnesota Public Utilities Commission has rejected a nearly two-fold increase in fixed charges for CenterPoint Energy Resource’s residential customers, and ordered a mechanism – decoupling – for the gas utility that’s aimed at encouraging more energy savings. [Energy Collective]
  • The new 600-kW Storms Hog Farm biogas plant in North Carolina has passed its proof-of-concept stage, leaving the field wide open to build even bigger hog manure biogas plants in the state. With a hog population of 10 million, that could add up to quite a bit of biogas. [CleanTechnica]
  • The Consumer Electronics Association issued a new report on the amount of electricity used by US consumer electronics and the good news is that it’s finally begun to come down. But the total is still enormous, equal to the output of over 50 large polluting power plants. [Energy Collective]
  • EDF Renewable Energy has awarded two contracts to Vestas to support the 150 MW Slate Creek Wind Project in Kansas with 75 wind turbines of 2 MW each, and the 300 MW Roosevelt Wind Project in New Mexico with an additional 150, also of 2 MW. [Energy Business Review]
  • Without the economic relief, five of New Jersey’s county landfill projects are in jeopardy of closing this year, according to a lobbyist representing the facilities. They include projects in Warren, Sussex, Burlington, Atlantic, and Salem counties. [NJ Spotlight]
  • In Vermont, the Washington Electric Co-op is proposing changes to their net metering program. They propose to add a fixed customer charge and a new grid service fee based on the amount of power the net metering member generates. [vtdigger.org]

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