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Summer is a wonderful time for water fun, if you know where to go and what to do there. There are literally hundreds of sites with various activities in New Hampshire and Vermont, far to many to print in this publication. What we can do for our readers instead is to provide a list of on-line resources for swimming, boating, and other water-related fun in New Hampshire and Vermont.

Both New Hampshire and Vermont have great parks, and many allow water activities. A list of New Hampshire’s 23 state parks, 41 state forests, one national forest, and one national wildlife refuge can be found at bit.ly/get-nh-parks. It has links to web pages on each park, giving information on what resources are there, along with location and contact information. (Please note that bitly links have to be entered exactly as given, including capitalization. We have made things as easy as we could by putting everything in lower case.)

A web resource for state parks in Vermont, with links to information on specific lakes and more links relating to different types of boating can be found at bit.ly/get-vt-parks. Special information on swimming in Vermont’s state parks can be found at bit.ly/get-vt-parks-swimming. It has links to pages on various parks, along with links to sites telling where to go for special purposes, such as places where you can bring your pet with you.

The sites on parks do not cover all lakes and rivers. Information telling the size, locations, and other information about specific lakes can be found online. A tour guide list of lakes in New Hampshire can be accessed at bit.ly/get-nh-lakes. Two resources for Vermont’s lakes, with links to pages on specific lakes, are at bit.ly/get-vt-lakes-1 and bit.ly/get-vt-lakes-2. Again, these have links to pages on the specific lakes.

Good resources for rivers in Vermont and New Hampshire are articles in Wikipedia. These have extensive list of rivers in the two states, organized in some cases by watershed. Many of the rivers and streams listed have their own separate articles in Wikipedia. Also, there are links provided to other resources at many Wikipedia articles. The article for rivers in New Hampshire can be found at bit.ly/get-nh-rivers. The article for Vermont’s rivers is at bit.ly/get-vt-rivers-1. A second resource for Vermont’s rivers is at bit.ly/get-vt-rivers-2.

We want to remind people that while fishing is a great outdoor activity in New Hampshire and Vermont, most of the water in these states has been polluted by mercury and other toxins from industrial plants and vehicles in the states and provinces to the west of us. It is very important to check the levels of pollution in the individual lakes, rivers, ponds, or streams that you want to fish in, if you intend to eat the fish. Some waters, even pristine-looking streams and ponds, are polluted so badly that the fish really should not be eaten at all. Others are safe, if the amount of fish from them is limited. Information on fishing in New Hampshire can be found at bit.ly/get-nh-fish-safety. Information of fishing in Vermont can be found at bit.ly/get-vt-fish-safety.

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